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Saturday
Feb272010

American Apparel: anti slave labour - but pro-porn

Spreading the word on behalf of ipetitions:
American Apparel is looking for the best bottom in the world to be the "face" of their new ad campaign.  They're inviting girls and women to upload pictures of their butts to the website (wearing AA underwear or body suits, of course) and then asking people to judge the submissions with a score of 1-5 and the option to add snarky comments. It’s low budget and lowbrow. For girls, however, it’s
high stakes.
Here's their invitation: "Confident about the junk in your trunk? Show us your assets! Post a photo of your booty's best side for judgment. We're looking for a brand new bum (the best in the world!) to be the new "face" for our always expanding intimates and briefs lines. The winners will be flown to LA, photographed and featured online. Send in a close-up photo of your backside wearing American Apparel panties, bodysuits or briefs for consideration and vote for your personal favorites."
Geez, American Apparel, try listening to girls instead of objectifying them. As Thalia, age 19, says, “You don't need to exploit us to benefit your company. Someone who is a CEO should have more common sense, don't you think?”
We do.
So, here’s our reply – grow up and get someone on your marketing team who’s got some brain cells and some principles. Sign our letter to AA’s CEO and Corporate Relations people to add your name to the protest.
Joseph Teklits and Jean Fontana, Corporate Relations
Dov Charney, CEO
747 Warehouse St.
Los Angeles, CA 90021
Dear American Apparel:
The sexualization of women and porn-inspired media have infiltrated the everyday culture of the youngest girls. According to the 2007 APA Task Force on the Sexualization of Girls in Media, the negative impact on girls and women is indisputable: the sexualization and objectification of girls and women in media wreak havoc on our psychological, emotional, cognitive and relational lives.
Your recent campaign is a perfect example of the insidious ways marketers and media promote sexualization and body obsession as “girl power.” American Apparel is directly and unconscionably undermining girls’ healthy development by equating confidence with looking sexy, winning with being judged on their appearance, and personal value with 15 seconds of fame. The objectification of girls’ and women’s bodies is a real concern in a country where 1 in 4 women is a victim of violence, and sexual harassment is rampant. This ad campaign invites girls to self-objectify, inviting girls to post pictures of just one body part, and inviting others to comment and rate it is demeaning and dangerous.
By launching this campaign at a time when sexting is in the headline news, American Apparel is literally placing girls in jeopardy of prosecution by inviting them to post highly sexualized images of themselves online.
Don’t insult us with the usual defense: this is not real girl power; this is
not just girls feeling good, making choices or feeling confident in their bodies. American Apparel is selling girls for parts, and we’re not buying.  We demand that you stop this ad campaign today and commit to more responsible marketing practices.

American Apparel is looking for the best bottom in the world to be the "face" of their new ad campaign.  They're inviting girls and women to upload pictures of their butts to the website (wearing AA underwear or body suits, of course) and then asking people to judge the submissions with a score of 1-5 and the option to add snarky comments. It’s low budget and lowbrow. For girls, however, it’shigh stakes.
Here's their invitation: "Confident about the junk in your trunk? Show us your assets! Post a photo of your booty's best side for judgment. We're looking for a brand new bum (the best in the world!) to be the new "face" for our always expanding intimates and briefs lines. The winners will be flown to LA, photographed and featured online. Send in a close-up photo of your backside wearing American Apparel panties, bodysuits or briefs for consideration and vote for your personal favorites."
Geez, American Apparel, try listening to girls instead of objectifying them. As Thalia, age 19, says, “You don't need to exploit us to benefit your company. Someone who is a CEO should have more common sense, don't you think?”
We do.
So, here’s our reply – grow up and get someone on your marketing team who’s got some brain cells and some principles. Sign our letter to AA’s CEO and Corporate Relations people to add your name to the protest.
Joseph Teklits and Jean Fontana, Corporate RelationsDov Charney, CEO747 Warehouse St.Los Angeles, CA 90021
Dear American Apparel:
The sexualization of women and porn-inspired media have infiltrated the everyday culture of the youngest girls. According to the 2007 APA Task Force on the Sexualization of Girls in Media, the negative impact on girls and women is indisputable: the sexualization and objectification of girls and women in media wreak havoc on our psychological, emotional, cognitive and relational lives.
Your recent campaign is a perfect example of the insidious ways marketers and media promote sexualization and body obsession as “girl power.” American Apparel is directly and unconscionably undermining girls’ healthy development by equating confidence with looking sexy, winning with being judged on their appearance, and personal value with 15 seconds of fame. The objectification of girls’ and women’s bodies is a real concern in a country where 1 in 4 women is a victim of violence, and sexual harassment is rampant. This ad campaign invites girls to self-objectify, inviting girls to post pictures of just one body part, and inviting others to comment and rate it is demeaning and dangerous.
By launching this campaign at a time when sexting is in the headline news, American Apparel is literally placing girls in jeopardy of prosecution by inviting them to post highly sexualized images of themselves online.
Don’t insult us with the usual defense: this is not real girl power; this isnot just girls feeling good, making choices or feeling confident in their bodies. American Apparel is selling girls for parts, and we’re not buying.  We demand that you stop this ad campaign today and commit to more responsible marketing practices.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN THE PETITION: http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/americanapparel/

or if you want to make a graphic response go to the anti porn activist site and graffiti some of your old knickers with a message:

http://antipornactivist.com/americanapparel.html

An american Apparel Billboard in the States which was defaced

Want to read more?- Reasons American Apparel Sucks - article

Reader Comments (11)

I don't find American Apparel that offensive--in my view their ad campaigns too ironic for that. "Finding the New Bum of American Apparel" sounds to me like a piss take of "Finding the New Face of Revlon" and in that way a very clever, indeed a potentially feminist comment on the advertising culture. And their ads are certainly no more sexualized that other bodies that occupy billboards. I also take issue with a complete reaction against pornography--there is women-made and focused porn out there, and I know plenty of feminists who like pornography. Of course there are many, many problems related to pornography, but a blanket ban... I don't know.

In any case, I enjoy your blog. It makes me think. And offers more perspectives on issues that are often circling through my head. Thanks!

http://thewaitingartist.wordpress.com
March 4, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterThe Waiting Artist
American apparel is awesome...... if you don't like it don't buy it, some people like that kind of culture
April 8, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterJesus
Its their choice whether they want their ass shown everywhere. Maybe in their world they are thinking why don't you model and show your beautiful woman body to the public. In this world there are women who will do that and there are women that won't. Just like there are people that will do strait porn and there is people that won't. You want porn to stop then why not try to stop actual porn. which you shouldn't do either because it is the biggest collector of the entertainment industry for a reason. Realize.
May 12, 2010 | Unregistered Commenterdukeizzle
The problem is that the posing on AA ads is influenced by porn images and the specific way of "staging" or presenting (especially female) bodies in porn movies and images. Through more or less "ironic" and at first glance maybe kind of harmless fashion images, the way women (and men, too) are presented and objectified in porn movies more and more spreads in mainstream culture and we adapt it as a normal way of seeing people - because there the context, in which you can identify such posing/objectifying as a part of porn production and "methods", is gone. I think that's a questionable development.

(PS: sorry in case something isn't understandable - my english isn't perfect).
May 18, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterJukie
sexist and sick ban american apparel.
It is encouraging the sex trade
June 3, 2010 | Unregistered Commentersamuel welsh
i like this article but that grafitti on the billboard shits me.
there is only one answer to why women get raped - men.
it has little to do with advertising or clothes
July 27, 2010 | Unregistered Commentercharlotte
Some ads are very X-rated though

and well other love to feel confident about themselve

we living in a different generation now there is always gonna be negatives and positives remarks

everyone has opinions NOW in days
August 23, 2010 | Unregistered Commenterruhtie
The ads are tasteless and even creepy plus they glorify young girls as sex objects, so yes, I do find American Apparel ads offensive, so I don't buy their products, my choice. I find the idea of censorship even more offensive because, "be careful what you wish for", censorship chips away at our civil liberties and we have precious few of them left as it is. If you don't like it, don't look at it, if the company offends you, don't spend your money on their shit. VOTE WITH YOUR DOLLAR! EDUCATE YOUR CHILDREN TO RECOGNIZE QUALITY FROM CRAP! TEACH YOUR KIDS TO RESPECT ONE ANOTHER!
September 22, 2010 | Unregistered Commenterhezsilla
It's stupid to compare slave labor and a model wearing underwear. She's at least 18. She's not being forced. It's her RIGHT to be able to have pictures taken of her in her underwear if that's what she WANTS to do. Oh yeah let's make all women keep their knees covered and outlaw bikinis. That's what feminism is.
November 22, 2010 | Unregistered Commenterbrittah2oh
I can't agree more. American Apparel are crossing porn lines.
June 24, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterShirley Hart
The sexualization of women and porn-inspired media have infiltrated the everyday culture of the youngest girls. According to the 2007 APA Task Force on the Sexualization of Girls in Media, the negative impact on girls and women is indisputable: the sexualization and objectification of girls and women in media wreak havoc on our psychological, emotional, cognitive and relational lives.
January 22, 2012 | Unregistered CommenterWill Smith
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